Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Photo Essay: Rosh Chodesh Adar

My great-grandfather's shtetl

Train tracks leading west out of the shtetl

S.S. Furnessia - Arrived in New York City on Rosh Chodesh Adar
(February 23, 1898)

Philadelphia 1898 - Reunited with his older brother

Train tracks located next to his new home in America

My great-grandfather's house/grocery store

Site of his house, now an empty lot (1999)

My son, named after my great-grandfather - June 2004

24 Comments:

At March 1, 2006 at 6:40:00 AM EST, Blogger Tamara said...

This is so cool. Thanks for the brief history.

 
At March 1, 2006 at 7:35:00 AM EST, Blogger yitz said...

Really nice pictorial history piece! My great-grandfather came over slightly before, around 1890, settling first in the Lower East Side of NYC, then they moved to Boro Park Bklyn, before my grandparents & parents moved to the Rockaways [all NYC] in the early 1950s.

 
At March 1, 2006 at 7:38:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Tamara & Yitz: Thank you. I am glad you both enjoyed it.

 
At March 1, 2006 at 8:59:00 AM EST, Blogger torontopearl said...

What a beautiful and original photo essay.

Did you notice baby boy in his "pondering pose"? Already a thinker in those early days...probably thinking about the acts of chesed he would be doing as he grows up!

 
At March 1, 2006 at 9:05:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Thanks Pearl :) I really enjoyed your thought! G-d willing, that is just what he will do.

 
At March 1, 2006 at 11:55:00 AM EST, Anonymous chabakuk elisha said...

WOW - What a great post!

It is an incredible thing to have compiled. It must be so fulfilling and exciting to have reconstructed the legacy, and provide it for the next link in the chain. Ashrecha!

 
At March 1, 2006 at 12:27:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Chabakuk Elisha: It is very fulfilling. I am still trying to find out how my great-grandfather made his way across Europe and got to Glasgow where he boarded the S.S. Furnessia.

 
At March 1, 2006 at 6:51:00 PM EST, Blogger FrumGirl said...

Wow I think it is amazing that you have all that history and pictures! Your son is beautiful!

 
At March 1, 2006 at 7:22:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Frumgirl: Thanks - he is actually much cuter these days with his long blonde hair :)

 
At March 1, 2006 at 8:08:00 PM EST, Blogger Tamara said...

WOnderful! If you go to my blog, and scroll down a few, I posted some old pics and a brief history. :) I love that you have SO much history of your family. That's very special. OH, and so is your adorable son! Mazel tov!

 
At March 1, 2006 at 11:58:00 PM EST, Blogger Stacey said...

What an awesome pictoral history. Very cool. I enjoyed reading your map (I studied Russian in college). Your son is just adorable!

 
At March 2, 2006 at 4:24:00 AM EST, Blogger Mottel said...

Things seem to have gone full circle

 
At March 2, 2006 at 6:54:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Tamara: Thanks for pointing that out. I too enjoy looking at old family pictures.

Stacey: I wish I had taken Russian as well. I took German (yuck) in junior high and high school and Hebrew in college (and one semester of Yiddish).

Mottel: Exactly. That is why I named my son after him.

 
At March 2, 2006 at 4:58:00 PM EST, Blogger Richard Lawrence Cohen said...

Touching and simple, as your blog name implies. I found your site through Yehoshua Karsh's Musings of a Jewish Soul, and I'm glad I did.

My maternal ancestors came from a shetl called Soroki in Bessarabia (now Moldova) on the Dneister River north of Odessa. My paternal ancestors came from Bialystok, Poland. Both families emigrated to the Lower East Sde of NY at the turn of the century, then migrated to the South Bronx and -- paradise! -- the central Bronx, where I grew up. I'm now in Texas and have kids and relatives all over -- by no means all of them Jewish.

 
At March 2, 2006 at 6:02:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Richard: Welcome. Rabbi Karsh indeed has a wonderful blog which I read every day as well.

Thank you for your compliments on my blog as well as sharing the history of your family.

 
At March 2, 2006 at 9:16:00 PM EST, Blogger Alice said...

What a little sugar pie.

 
At March 3, 2006 at 2:20:00 AM EST, Blogger Judah HaKohain said...

Beautiful.

 
At March 3, 2006 at 6:39:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Alice & Judah HaKohain: Thanks ;)

 
At March 5, 2006 at 11:37:00 AM EST, Blogger PsychoToddler said...

Extremely cool. It's so important to try to assemble all of this while it's still available. The next generation is horribly ignorant of where they came from.

 
At March 5, 2006 at 6:31:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Psychotoddler: Thanks! I totally agree with you and this is why I am doing it.

 
At March 6, 2006 at 9:47:00 PM EST, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you. Those pictures are so precious, and especially is the one of your son. To me, it looks like he is still 'reviewing' shas before he begins learning all over again.

My great grandparents went to Philadelphia also. My gr-grandfather was a tailor in West Philadelphia in the early 1900's, and they lived in an old Jewish neighborhood near there. I was born in and raised in Philly.

What area in or near Philly was the grocery store?
Do you have a passenger list from the S.S. Furnissia?
What port did the ship leave from and unload at?
I'm so curious because I have also been collecting as much data as I can about my family.

 
At March 7, 2006 at 6:41:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Anonymous:

Many of my family members also lived in West Philly as well. My grandparents lived in the Wynnewood/Armore area.

1) The grocery store was actually not in Philly but in Linwood/Marcus Hook where my great-grandfather moved after living in Philadelphia for some time.

2) Yes, I have the passenger list

3) The Furnessia left from Glasgow and unloaded in NYC.

 
At February 19, 2007 at 12:20:00 PM EST, Blogger Neil Harris said...

The pics say it all. Awesome!!

 
At February 19, 2007 at 12:34:00 PM EST, Blogger Barzilai said...

Fascinating to have all that history. My family's history blurs at WWII, and everything before is only hagiography and broad generalization, or speculative and vague.

 

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