Monday, November 27, 2006

Where Is Written Guidance On This?


Do you write B"H or BS"D on the top of pieces of paper you are writing on?

What things don't you write it on?

Do you know in what sefer it is written that you should do this, or do you do it because everyone else does?

13 Comments:

At November 27, 2006 at 10:33:00 AM EST, Blogger Neil Harris said...

I actually write "Beis Eyin Hay" (B'Erzras Hashem).

 
At November 27, 2006 at 10:36:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

For any particular reason?

 
At November 27, 2006 at 11:29:00 AM EST, Blogger Neil Harris said...

My rebbe from E'Y does it. I usually write it on notes. I need to figure out how to load it on blogger. :)

 
At November 27, 2006 at 12:27:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Do know why your rebbe does it or which sefer tells you to do it?

 
At November 27, 2006 at 1:42:00 PM EST, Blogger FrumWithQuestions said...

Thats a very good question and I was wondering the same thing myself. I hope you get an answer and will let everyone know when you do.

 
At November 27, 2006 at 1:45:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Frum with Questions: I have asked rabbis this question and not only do they not know the answer, they don't even know where to go to find the answer.

I will chalk it up with the idea to those that hold that one cannot eat fish and cheese together; they tell you you can't do it, but can't cite a citation.

 
At November 27, 2006 at 2:34:00 PM EST, Blogger The Observer said...

Well I've stopped doing it. My wife has a psak from her Rav that they are shemos and must be but in geniza. Since I'm tired of accumulating lots of tiny pieces of paper, we've stopped doing it at all.

 
At November 27, 2006 at 6:02:00 PM EST, Anonymous Neshama said...

When I was attending classes in Eretz HaKodesh, it was impressed on me that I should use BS"D on personal letters instead of B"H because of the H (the Hebrew of course).

BTW there is no isser to these appearing on a computer screen because they are actually drops linked together against light - a bit technical, but ok. I found this somewhere I cannot remember.

My husband is always after me about my print-outs - to be super careful. I prefer to do the bulk of reading on paper and not glued to the screen. So this is where I have a similar problem. I save the papers for erev Pesach.

 
At November 28, 2006 at 1:51:00 AM EST, Blogger Mottel said...

For some reason it looks like me comment didn't post.
Anyhow.
Though B"H is bezras hashem, it is normally written B"H.
About fish and cheese.
It's rooted in Yoreh Deah Simon 87 (If I recall). Most poskim say it's a printing mistake (it should have been speaking about fish and meat not milk.)
At least among Lubavitchers, we don't mix milk and fish, but with cheese or the like, there's no problem.

 
At November 28, 2006 at 9:02:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Neshama and Mottel: Do you know in what sefer it instructs one to do this?

Mottel: I have noticed that Lubavitchers will not eat a bagel with cream cheese [Cholov Yisroel] and lox though...

 
At November 28, 2006 at 12:38:00 PM EST, Anonymous chabakuk elisha said...

As best I can rememeber, the minhag of writing B"H, BE"H or BS"D at the top of a paper is about being mekayim "shvisi hashem lenegdi tomid." I have no idea where a source for this is found, but I think I remember that the Lubavitcher Rebbe spoke about this once... maybe someone else remembers?

I have also heard this about the H in B"H before, but I never understood it - What is so sheimus making about the letter Hey? If I write hey-shin-mem on a paper it dosent become sheimus, does it? And why is BS"D better?

Almost every group has people that won't eat cream chese and lox, and people that do. I don't think it's a "Lubavitcher" thing - Some do, some don't.

 
At November 29, 2006 at 9:05:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

I would be very interested to read the Lubavitcher Rebbe's thoughts on this.

As a side note, even if the Rebbe instructed his followers to do this, it doesn't explain why others do it or where they are getting guidance from.

 
At November 29, 2006 at 9:47:00 AM EST, Anonymous chabakuk elisha said...

It predates the Lubavitcher Rebbe; I only meant to say that I think it's very likely that he also discussed the reasons, sources, etc.

 

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