Tuesday, November 21, 2006

My Favorite Niggun - Kumi Roni

During my blogging vacation, my friend Chaim posted links to Yosef Karduner videos. Included among them is my favorite niggun; Kumi Roni.



My four year-old daughter was standing next to me the first time I watched this video on the computer and she immediately started singing along. She instantly recognized this niggun since I sing it at the Shabbos table every week. Nevertheless, I was still amazed how it was ingrained in her mind and how much it was a part of her.

10 Comments:

At November 21, 2006 at 12:49:00 PM EST, Anonymous A Yid said...

Nice music, but sounds too "pop" for me. Not at all the style I prefer.

 
At November 21, 2006 at 1:01:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Who do you prefer to listen to?

 
At November 22, 2006 at 1:51:00 AM EST, Anonymous A Yid said...

The nigun itself I like. It is a tantz nigun from the Mezheritcher Maggid zy"o. It is sung without words traditionally in Breslov. Words "Kumi royni" for it is however someone's recent innovation. What I don't relate here is the style it is played which sounds almost like rock. I prefer kleyzmer style for such nigunim.

 
At November 22, 2006 at 7:29:00 AM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

It was Rabbi Nachman Burstein who added the words. I don't understand how you think it sounds like rock. There is a bare bones accompaniement - it is just him and a guitar (and an accoustic one at that).

 
At November 22, 2006 at 3:28:00 PM EST, Anonymous A Yid said...

> It was Rabbi Nachman Burstein who added the words

Still, there are those who don't sing it words, as it was done originally. (In Breslov for some reason for a while there was a trend to make words for all nigunim, but I personally think that it takes away something from the nigun which is sung without words. Many Breslovers still sing such nigunim in original format).

That's my personal preception (about rock etc.). Tastes differ.

 
At November 23, 2006 at 2:59:00 PM EST, Blogger yitz said...

I often have this conflict - on the one hand, a niggun without words lets your neshama soar, you get totally absorbed in the music & what it does for you. On the other hand, the words allow for easy memorization of the tune, and make it more identifiable - they give a "handle", as it were, to the niggun. I have posted both sides of this argument on my blog.
Modzitz usually stresses the niggun without words. However, this year the new Rebbe Shlita has been emphasizing singing his niggunim davka WITH the words!
ASJ - this too, is one of my favorite non-Modzitz niggunim. Of course, most Modzitz niggunim come before it. I often use it on the Shabbos preceding my father's yahrzeit [23 Kislev], which is close to the time of the Maggid's YZ on the 19th.
And Karduner's rendition is very good!!!

 
At November 23, 2006 at 3:34:00 PM EST, Blogger A Simple Jew said...

Yitz: Wow! We are finally starting to agree on niggunim matters :)

 
At November 23, 2006 at 4:14:00 PM EST, Blogger yitz said...

I knew you'd come around...
:))

 
At November 26, 2006 at 5:28:00 AM EST, Anonymous praznik said...

http://bresslev.info/music/asx/nafshi/nigun4.asx

"קומי רוני" מהאלבום "נפשי החזקה".

מתוך: http://breslev.org

 
At January 13, 2012 at 1:58:00 PM EST, Blogger moshe yah NOW! said...

i feel like your child !

 

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